Friday, July 29

Flying your true colors - another internet fail

I have long held that Italians really know how to copy. They dub films flawlessly, they share answers on exams, and the counterfeit bags & shoes are often just as good as the real McCoys (or Guccis, as the case may be).  It's just that in an internet age, it gets harder and harder to get away with it.  People who once thought, "Boy, I've seen that somewhere before" now can find out where - exactly - in about the same amount of time it would take to type out white on risotto.  
So, it came with some amusement when I found Digital Communications agency founder, Marco Massarotto's posting of this find on LinkedIN that he picked up on Twitter.
Check out Italy's Ministry of the Interior home page.  It sports a classy 3-D mockup of the tricolore, Italy's flag which seems folded like a book - or maybe, in a smart attempt to look 'inside' Italy, in what is a visual double entendre.  Click here for link.


In defense of our Italian ministry, who's to say who came first, but...those Londoners are pretty good when it comes to designing logos and whatnot.  So, click here for the French Property Exhibition taking place London's Olympia fairgrounds. 

I guess that when it comes to flags, seeing that you change the colors only, sporting similar shapes means it's fair ground. Or maybe it was a Creative Commons open source logo after all.  Nonetheless, someone in a creative dept somewhere needs to get a pay cut.

3 comments:

Jacques said...

To be honest, it seems a bit of inconsequential parallelism, to me (and I am quite more cynically inclined than the next guy, trust me...). The doors seem at slightly different angles (though that is a naked eye assessment...) as well as the fact that the French logo is two-color while the Italian one is with lighting (shining out of the "door"), I would think they could be quite separate origins. Especially considering that both flags' style (three vertical stripes) has existed for quite a while, as has the concept of prospective representation...
Sorry, difficult to see Malice here boss.

Francesca Maggi said...

Jacques - I am always appreciative of your corrections!!! As usual, you have a point. Although I still think they're awfully similar (and similarly awful), the internet was all hot & bothered...but no one said whose came first!

Grazie.
fm

Jacques said...

Sorry if it came across as an attempt at a correction, as your article had nothing whatsoever that I saw as wrong. I also do agree that both are probably sub-average in their efficacy. I was just pointing out a couple of possibly mitigating considerations which could indicate independent origins. Of course, a slight change in perspective angle, and the flash of light (or the switch to solid tints) could also just be the way an inadequate or time pressed designer covers for a lack of imagination.